Yum! Dim Sum

Sure, we experienced Hong Kong, but it was our stomachs that led the way. The city is delicious. And though hotels and housing are expensive, pretty much everything else is super affordable. The food in China has been good, but between a combination of language and not knowing what to order to finding most things coated in a thick sea of oil, we were over the moon for both the culinary diversity of Hong Kong and the ability to communicate almost anything in English.

Rice noodle wrapping BBQ pork. Our favorite.

Dim Sum was our favorite and in our week there we only ate it four times. If they served it for dinner, it would have been more.

BBQ pork bao.

I’m happy to say that unlike Chinese restaurants in England and the U.S., which are delicious but not like the food we’ve experienced in China. Dim Sum is surprisingly and happily very similar to what we find in Cantonese restaurants at home. But better. Naturally.

Yum.

Our favorite dim sum restaurant that we found near the Western Market was the massive Fung Shing. It was always packed but especially on Saturday when we had to wait for a table. It was a great scene with young and old, families and friends, a rowdy group of construction workers, those leisurely reading newspapers and those rushing to eat and get out. Our little table of two was in the minority. Dim sum is definitely better as a group activity. Aside from good company, you get to order and sample more.

Duck neck.

The consistent winner was the rice noodle roll with BBQ pork. Multiple orders needed. Nuff said.

Shrimp shumai.

 

Curry noodles.

 

Don't remember what this was aside from delicious.

 

 


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  1. […] saw western brands and stores like Patagonia that we haven’t seen since we were home. We had dim sum, the traditional small plate breakfasts, almost every single day — so […]



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